Safari Club International Utah Chapter
 

Hunts for Warriors

Posted by admin on 10/26/2017


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Imagine yourself in a foreign country, at a young age, away from trusted family and surrounded by enemy fire after an exhausting 24-hour call to duty. That’s exactly what happened back on March 27th, 1966 at Tuy Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. Named as a local Hero, Glenn Pearmain, a Utah Soldier was honored for this Vietnam mission unloading vital ammunition and supplies from his helicopter while dodging Viet Cong gunfire. Glenn earned the Army Commendation medal at age 21. While serving as a crew chief of a helicopter carrying supplies to combat troops of the 101st Airborne Brigade, Glenn Pearmain, and his gunner unloaded the helicopter cargo in an area where intense enemy gunfire was keeping the U.S. troops pinned down, and out of ammunition. Most of the enemy gunfire was directed at Glenn and his helicopter, with total disregard for his own personal safety while carrying heavy crates of ammunition to the troops. Glenn’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army, and his heroic actions rendered a successful mission with no casualties. Actual photo from the first helicopter returning from the Tuy Hoa assault, lost one helicopter that day which is the reason for the smoke background at Lighthouse Mountain. Glenn Pearmain averaged anywhere from 15-20 hours of daily flying support and medivac missions which included picking up wounded and dead soldiers. Between November 1965 to November 1966, Glenn was shot down 3 times, lost an engine and ended up in the Rice paddies (photo below), and wounded 3 separate times. Fast forward 51 years and more than 7,000 miles away, the Safari Club International Utah Chapter was privileged and honored to extend our gratitude to this well-deserving Vietnam Veteran. Glenn Pearmain, 72 years of age is an avid outdoorsman and enjoys hunting but has never been fortunate enough to harvest a Rocky Mountain elk. This would soon change. The first evening, scouting for elk resulted in a positive and refreshing attitude, this hunt was for real. Several decent bulls were seen but for the time being, it would have to wait until the next day. During the evening dinner, Glenn shared Vietnam memories which some were difficult for him to fully express. The next day could not come soon enough, and early that Saturday morning Sept 30th, 2017 it all came together. The weather and temperature could not have been more accommodating, warm with a bit of overcast and brisk fall atmosphere. The plan was to position a small group of spotters on a popular rock pile for locating any elk. End of the rut season had the elk restless and still bugling which if you have ever hunted elk, is quite exciting. It was not long until we started spotting elk, mostly cows for the first part however as the morning progressed the bulls became active. Two large bulls could be seen from several hundred yards away but with maturity, they kept themselves hidden showing only their massive racks above the cedar trees. The second group, including Glenn Pearmain drove ATV’s down the road to a better advantage location. With the elk bugling, it was exciting to locate several good bull elk while communicating between the two hunting groups on 2-way radios. By this time, both groups had spotted the same two large bull elk hidden in the cedars, and noticed two other bulls in the same vicinity and closer in range. Glenn’s physical mobility is not what it used to be however, the heart-pounding excitement did not stop him from positioning himself for a better view. It was not long afterwards, 8:05 AM to be exact, that a sharp crack was heard from Glenn’s 270 win-mag rifle. An impressive one-shot display of marksmanship at 170 yards, Glenn harvested his first elk. Scored at 320, a beautiful 6×6 elk in the Southern beaver mountain range.  Despite his physical condition, he accepted the extraordinary challenge because of his love for hunting. A veteran doesn’t need to be physically injured to have his or her head in a dark place. The outdoor experience makes you realize how much more life has to offer. That’s plenty of reason to consider taking a veteran hunting. Hunting is positive therapy for Military Warriors. Spending time with Glenn while harvesting this magnificent elk was an amazing moment, not only for him but everyone involved. To see the smile on his face, emotions and gratitude is very hard to explain. We are the ones who need to be thanking him for letting us have the privilege of hunting with a true hero. Congratulations Glenn and well done, thanks for your dedication and service to our country. We owe a great deal of thanks to all of our veterans, and at the least make them feel like rock stars for a weekend. These men and women have given so much and their families have sacrificed as well. The more we can do for them, the better off we all are. The Safari Club International Utah Chapter would like to extend our sincere thanks to Royal Point Ranch and his brother Jeff Pearmain for making this happen and a hunt to remember.

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